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About this blog



When I started this blog in the summer of 2011 I never thought I'd go on blogging for several years. My very first blog post Do Not Sit Down Next to Strangers was born out of conversations with my international friends about cultural differences. I thought, why not write down my thoughts and observations and explain Switzerland and Swiss life to an international audience?

Having lived abroad for big parts of my life helped me gain the distance needed to observe objectively even when things are very familiar. Other ingredients for my successful journey into the blogging sphere include a love for writing and language, a knack for putting something in a nutshell and a seemingly never ending stream of ideas for blogposts. Though, I must admit, at times I've been struggling to find interesting new topics.

Nonetheless, I've had several popular blog posts and pages over the last five years. Posts that are read again and again every month. I'd like to take this opportunity and share with you my all time top 10 blog posts and top 3 pages.

My Top 10 Blog Posts
  1. 10 Fun Things to do on a Rainy Day in Switzerland
  2. How to Spot a Swiss Person
  3. Funny Swiss German Phrases
  4. Schätzli, Schnügel and Müüsli
  5. Online Clothes Shopping
  6. Vermicelles
  7. Toblerone
  8. Basic Swiss German
  9. Valentine's Day in Switzerland
  10. Ovomaltine

My Top 3 Pages

As to myself as a person. My name is Irene and I'm a Swiss woman in my early thirties and currently living in South America. Maybe this should have been the first sentence in this description. Yet, who I am seems secondary in this blog writing endeavor. My posts, my writing is what matters here.





Written and published October 16th, 2016





© 2016 IRENE WYRSCH "A HUMOROUS GUIDE TO SWITZERLAND" ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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